Ark has just opened a new primary school in India. The school, in New Delhi, is the first that we have set up and operated outside the UK. We’re working with the South Delhi Municipal Corporation to create a network of fee-free, high quality primary schools. Our aim is to open 20 high-performing schools in India by 2020.

          

Ark has just opened its first school in India

The school, in New Delhi, is the first that we have set up and operated outside the UK. We’re working with the South Delhi Municipal Corporation to create a network of fee-free, high quality primary schools. Our aim is to open 20 high-performing schools in India by 2020.

We hope many more will follow – in India and elsewhere.

Since we began in 2002, we’ve helped 100,000 children across the world with our ambitious education programmes. But increasingly our focus is on opening schools for children who have been deprived of an education.

We’re already working in Uganda, where we support a network of 24 non-profit schools serving some of the country’s most disadvantaged communities. In partnership with the Ugandan Ministry of Education and Sports, and the educational charity PEAS, we’ve helped 11,000 children have a better start in life.

We are deliberately targeting children from the poorest families

Our mission is to ensure that children and young people have access to an excellent education, whatever their background.

India – compulsory education is just the start

There are huge challenges facing the education system in India.

In 2009, the Indian Parliament passed the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act. It was a landmark piece of legislation that made free, compulsory education a fundamental right for all children. But it was only the beginning.

Today, 35 per cent of children still do not complete primary school, and only 10 per cent complete secondary school. Meanwhile, a 2013 study found that 47 per cent of children in Grade 5 could not read a Grade 2 text.

We want to be a part of putting that right.

We are rewriting the rules of the typical classroom in India, providing an environment which will enable all children to learn and to flourish, not just a select few.